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Phone: +30 2752028021, +30 2752025562

Archaeological site of Mycenae

Mycenae 'Rich in Gold', the kingdom of mythical Agamemnon, first sung by Homer in his epics, is the most important and richest palatial centre of the Late Bronze Age in Greece. Its name was given to one of the greatest civilizations of Greek prehistory, the Mycenaean civilization, while the myths related to its history have inspired poets and writers over many centuries, from the Homeric epics and the great tragedies of the Classical period to contemporary literary and artistic creation. Perseus, son of Zeus and Dana?, daughter of Akrisios, king of Argos and descendant of Danaos, is traditionally considered as its mythical founder. Pausanias (2, 16, 3) reports that Perseus named the new city Mycenae after the pommel (mykes) of his sword, which fell there, or after the Perseia spring, discovered there under the root of a mushroom (mykes). According to the myth, Perseus's descendants reigned at Mycenae for three generations. After the last of them, Eurystheas, died childless, the Mycenaeans chose Atreus, son of Pelops, father of Agamemnon and Menelaos, as their king.

Mycenae was founded between two tall conical hills, Profitis Ilias (805 m.) and Sara (660 m.), on a low plateau dominating the Argive plain and controlling both the land and sea routes. The site was first occupied in the seventh millennium BC (Neolithic period). Very little remains of this early settlement because of continuous re-occupation up until the historical period. Most of the monuments visible today were erected in the Late Bronze Age, between 1350 and 1200 BC, when the site was at its peak. In the early second millennium BC a small settlement existed on the hill and a cemetery with simple burials on its southwest slope. Grave Circle B, a stone-built funerary enclosure containing monumental graves with rich grave gifts, indicates that the first families of rulers and aristocrats appeared at Mycenae at approximately 1700 BC. This social structure developed further in the early Mycenaean period, c. 1600 BC, when a large central building, a second funerary enclosure (Grave Circle A) and the first tholos tombs were erected on the hill. The finds from these monuments show that the powerful Mycenaean rulers participated in a complex network of commercial exchange with other parts of the Mediterranean.

Information

Mykines (Prefecture of Argolida)
Telephone: +30 27510 76585, +30 27510 76802

Link: http://odysseus.culture.gr/h/3/eh351.jsp?obj_id=2573

Tickets

  • Full: €8
  • Reduced: €4

Free admission days

  • Sundays in the period between 1 November and 31 March
  • The first Sunday of every month, except for July, August and September (when the first Sunday is holiday, then the second is the free admission day.)
  • 27 September, International Tourism Day
  • Free admission for:
  • University students from Greece and the E.U.

Contact

AGAMEMNON HOTEL

Address: Akti Miaouli 3, Nafplio, Argolis
P.C.: 21100
Email: nafplioagamemnon@gmail.com
Phone: +302752028021, +302752025562
Fax: 2752028022

Reservation